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20121201
20121231
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to do. when i was working on the speech, i was reading a copy of the new york times, and i saw a group of black women in southern africa carrying signs saying, "one man, one vote." so in my march on washington speech, i said, "'one man, one vote' is the african cry; it is ours, too. it must be ours." and that became the rallying cry for many other young people in the student nonviolent coordinating committee. amy goodman: and yet, you had to change that speech that you gave on that day. rep. john lewis: i was asked to change the speech. some people thought the speech was too radical, too militant. i thought it was a speech for the occasion. it represented the people that we were working with. some people didn't like the use of the word "revolution" or the use of the phrase "black masses." a. philip randolph came to my rescue and said, "there's not anything wrong with the use of 'revolution.' i use it myself sometimes. there's not anything with 'black masses.'" so we kept that part in the speech. but near the end of the speech, i said something like, "if we do not see meaningful progres
Search Results 0 to 1 of about 2 (some duplicates have been removed)